November 05, 2015

Easy come, easy go!

This is a blog re-post from November of 2014. It might help the boys and girls with their Practice Page on Thursday night. The page focuses on bullet points. We actually just finished the comparison activity I talk about here on Monday! 

If you scroll through the post, you'll see some helpful information and and LOL moment right here: ↓  

So yesterday it was, "Are you a teenager?" from a Kindergarten student, and today a Grade One child asked, "Why do you have some hairs that are white?" 
Sigh. 
Well, it was fun while it lasted. 

A few days ago, the boys and girls completed a character analysis(using a Venn Diagram) from the story This is NOT a Halloween Story. When I wrote the story, I was sure to include some distinctive similarities and differences in the characters for this activity. It was fun to see how students picked up on these little details! 


Today they worked with their elbow partners to create a larger version of only their best and most interesting facts about the characters.  We reviewed the expectations for working collaboratively and also the importance of making sure our words are spelled correctly. This was also an opportunity for students to practice using bullet points as we've been reviewing features of non-fictions texts in our Morning Messages.  

Here's what students have learned about bullet points: 
  • they emphasize important points
  • they can be written in full sentences or phrases
  • bullet points must be consistent (so if you start by writing sentences, they must all be sentences)
  • we can use numbered lists instead of bullet points
  • a bullet pointed list is preceded by a sentence that ends with a colon (:) 
In Math we looked at number lines. It's really important that students understand the halfway point between 10 and 20 is 15, between 20 and 30 is 25, etc.  This will help them when they are asked to estimate by drawing a number on a blank number line. 

We also reviewed our rounding skills as our introductory/warm-up activity in Math. It's essential that we constantly go back and revisit concepts in order for students to not only see the connection between Mathematical concepts, but also to master their skills. 









  

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